Origami crafts and ELT games

jan14

This school year, we decided to use ORIGAMI crafts, in our ” CUbeS: CUlture and Smiles in a CUbe”  etwinning project ! Origami, is such a creative form of Art!
Why is Origami good for our students?
Generally, Origami is good for our students, as it develops eye hand coordination, sequencing skills, spatial skills, memory, but also patience and attention skills.  Origami allows students to develop fine motor skills and mental concentration. All of this combined stimulates the brain – especially when BOTH hands are being used at the same time.
Add to these, the social aspects of Origami – learning about other cultures, working together, teaching each other and taking pride in your work –simply PERFECT for our etwinning project, this year!
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Young children will surprise us in the ability they show creating basic folds – start on origami patterns such as Fortune Tellers , Windmills and Paper Boats are a classic example of childhood origami projects! And you can quickly progress from there.
Oh.. and what childhood does NOT include a Paper Plane? Origami right there! I love this Origami Paper Plane video by this 7yr old. 
It is fantastic for cooperative learning – children learn to work together and support each other. It breaks down age barriers – a younger child may be able to help and older one. It is also a great way to learn about other cultures and communities. So the key aspects of Origami benefiting well being and social skills are:
  • Patience
  • Cooperative learning/ Working in together
  • Sense of achievement
  • Learning about other cultures
  • Community building (especially if working on an origami school project)
  • Sense of achievement & joy in the finished product
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A. The Origami Paper Airplane “You” game
This fun writing icebreaker or brainstorming activity, works well with all students.
To start, the students write three to five facts about themselves on a piece of paper. Remember to ask them to write their full name on one of the wings. Then they put their creativity to work by folding that paper into a paper airplane.
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On your count, everyone flies their planes toward the middle of the room. Then students pick up a plane that landed near them.
Students take turns reading the facts written on the plane and add one new fact about the person whose paper plane they have in their hands. Let the class help if individuals get stuck.
Repeat the procedure as many times as you wish
A class discussion may follow.
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Extra: another Paper Plane Game idea
Level: Any Level
Draw a target (with points – like a dart board) on the whiteboard or use a cardboard box in the middle of the room. Then, students make paper airplanes and launch them after they answer your question in the form of a sentence-in our case, about their etwinning partners.
I recommend formulating questions that lead to 1 or 2 types of answers. This allows for better memorization. For example, use CAN/WILL questions and write the beginning part of the answer on the board “I /My etwinning partner can/will…”.  I recommend giving a prize to make the target points mean something, thus peaking their interest
B.The Origami CHATTERBOX game
Chatterboxes (or fortune tellers or cootie catchers) are one of those classic toys that epitomise childhood…I remember lots of laughter playing with them with my cousins on summer holidays. This suggested game is a bit of a twist on the traditional chatterbox, perfect for our etwinning project, whilst also having a giggle.
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To make:
  • You will need a square of paper. Ours was the width of an A4 page – 21 centimetres.
  • Fold your chatterbox according to the instructions found here (or you could google up a Youtube video).
To play:
  1. Ask one student to read and choose a colour, from the outside of the chatterbox. Spell out its name as you open and close the chatterbox.
  2. Ask the student  to read and choose a number, on the inside of the chatterbox (you should only be able to see four choices). Spell out the chosen number, as you open and close the chatterbox.
  3. Ask your student to choose a number from the choices on the inside of the chatterbox that are open on the last letter spelt. Open the flap corresponding flap and read the name of one favourite sight, there.
  4. As far as our etwinning project is concerned: this is the sight, which that the student should visit on the relevant twinspace PAGE,to read and learn more about- and later write about what he/she has learned and his/her impressions, on the relevant twinspace FORUMS thread!
  5. Swap over and have fun letting your students be in charge this time, working in pairs…you might just have a hard time getting it back off them though!
 C. The Origami Paper Boat Game
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This is a game where you practice words that have to do with any topic – in our case, words that have to do with the second “CUbeS’ Page about our Country-  and your memory!
Hand one paper boat to each student. Give them some time to read all the info on it.
Start like this: say to the first student “a boat comes loaded”. The student answers “with what” and you say “with sunny islands”. Then the student continues to say to the next one in the class “a boat comes loaded”…he/she answer “with what”…the student says “with sunny islands and the Acropolis” for example. And then it continues like that “forever”.
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The students have to remember what words have been said and they have to come up with a new word/phrase having to do with the topic.
If anyone fails to remember all the words that have been said or if he/she can´t come up with a new word, they are out of the game. The winner is the one that can continue “forever” without failing. (It can be a looong day!)
When I played it with my class (Greeks 12 year olds) they didn´t want to stop so they continued the game even after the lesson was finished and I had left the room!!
Have fun learning about Greece-or any other topic- with this origami paper boat game!
D. The Origami windmill  “Call My Bluff / Two Truths and A Lie” game
Call My Bluff is a fun game which is perfect at the start of term as a ‘getting to know you’ kind of game but, it can also work in our etwinning “CUbeS” project .
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The game is excellent for practicing speaking skills, though make sure you save a time for after the game to comment on any mistakes students may have made during the game. (I generally like to reserve this for after the game, so you don’t disrupt their fluency by correcting them as they speak).
With older groups you can have some real fun and you might be surprised what you’ll learn about any given topic, when playing this particular EFL game.
How to play:
First, hand your students a paper windmill each. Allow some time to play with it and read all the info written on it.

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  • Write 3 statements about any given topic – or about the Greek school in our case- two of which should be lies and one which should be true.
  • Allow your students to ask you questions about each statement and then guess which one is the truth. You might want to practice your poker face before starting this game!
  • If they guess correctly then they win.
  • Extension: Give students time to write their own two truths and one lie.
  • Pair them up and have them play again, this time with their list, with their new partner. If you want to really extend the game and give students even more time to practice their speaking/listening skills, rotate partners every five minutes.
  • Bring the whole class back together and have students announce one new thing they learned about the given topic- or about the Greek school, in our case- as a recap.
E1. Easter Bunny-Flower corner bookmark craft
1.The bunny bookmark design, really is a very easy one:
Step 1: Begin my making your very basic Origami Corner Bookmark. There are step by step photos and worded instructions for you on this Origami Bookmark post – you can print these off too!
corner bookmark5

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Step 2: using any paper cut offs – cut out two large bunny ears. Add a little pink and glue to inside of your basic origami bookmark.
Step 3: add facial details.
That is it… you have made an adorable Paper Bunny Bookmark using printer paper!
Here’s a video link to help you create your own origami paper bunny corner bookmarks.
https://www.redtedart.com/easy-paper-bunny-bookmark/?jwsource=cl
2.You could also try to make the Flower corner bookmark.
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  1. Begin by making your basic Origami Bookmark in green – like leaves or the grass.
  2. Once you have your green bookmark base, it is time  to make your flowers.
  3. Decide on your colour combination of your flower bookmark, as well as the types of petals you would like. We made two different ones – the blue flower and the white daisy bookmark.
  4. For the blue flower bookmark, you will need 5 blue petals – oval shaped and one yellow one.
  5. For the daisy bookmark, I cut out 12 long thin white petals and one yellow oval for the centre of the daisy.
  6. Glue all your petals onto your bookmark, but take care not to stick them onto the lower part of your bookmark.
  7. Add your centre. Decorate with with your pens and rosy cheeks.
  8. Finally, you can make a little red ladybird or bee and as it as a cute detail.
Here’s the video link to help you create your own bookmarks.
https://youtu.be/jnzVYG09RYA
E2.-The origami Easter paper corner Board Race
First, hand each student one corner bookmark and give them enough time to read all the Easter customs and traditions vocabulary written on them.
Later, have them play the game below, in teams.
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There isn’t an EFL teacher I know who doesn’t use this game in the classroom. Board Race is a fun game that is used for revising vocabulary.
It is a great way of testing what your students already know about the subject you’re about to teach- in our case: a great way to teach/revise Easter vocabulary and learn more about Easter traditions in our  etwinning partners’ countries.
How to play:
First, watch this helpful video of real teachers using this game in the classroom by BridgeTEFL:
Here’s a step by step explanation:
  • Split the class into two teams and give each team a colored marker.
  • If you have a very large class, it may be better to split the students into teams of 3 or 4.
  • Draw a line down the middle of the board and write a topic- ie Easter in Greece- at the top.
  • The students must then write as many words as you require related to the topic in the form of a relay race.
  • Each team wins one point for each correct word. Any words that are unreadable or misspelled are not counted.
F1. Origami mini books craft
Here’s a picture which will help you make your own origami mini book.
And here’s a short video tutorial.
F2. The Origami Mini Book HANGMAN game
This classic game is a favorite for all students. It works no matter how many students are in the class.
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How to play:
As usual, hand each student one mini book-In our case, it’s a Greek Recipe mini Book .
Ask the students, to read them.
Then, play have them play this game.
In case you’ve never played, here’s a quick rundown.
  • Think of a -Greek recipe- word/name and write the number of letters on the board using dashes to show many letters there are.
  • Ask students to suggest a letter. If it appears in the word, write it in all of the correct spaces. If the letter does not appear in the word, write it off to the side and begin drawing the image of a hanging man.
  • Continue until the students guess the word correctly (they win) or you complete the diagram (you win).
  • They win an extra point, if they can tell you anything about that recipe, in correct English.

origami mini book

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